Drinkaware for Employers References

Here you'll find the references for the Drinkaware for Employers collateral.

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Claim Evidence Source
4: Alcohol, the workplace and wider social implications UK industry losing £7.3 bn a year to alcohol-related sickness absence In what it describes as an evidence paper which it submitted with its memorandum to our inquiry, the Department of Health tells us that the cost to the NHS of alcohol misuse is £3.5 billion a year (2009–10 costs), and that lost productivity due to alcohol across the UK is estimated at £7.3 billion a year (2009–10 costs). Great Britain, Parliament, House of Commons (2012)  Government’s Alcohol Strategy. London: The Stationery Office. HC 132(2012-13).

4: Alcohol, the workplace and wider social implications   

One in four employees is drinking likely at a level to contribute to these costs

 

NB Costs above refer to workplace sickness/absence; the evidence here refers to people with hangovers being slightly less productive while at work.

A survey carried out by YouGov for PruHealth found that on any given day around 200,000 British workers turn up to work hungover from the night before, which they admit impacts directly on their own productivity and safety in the workplace, in the following ways: … nearly one-in-four employees (22 per cent) admit to making mistakes at work as a result of being hungover. 83 per cent of employees who have been hungover at work admit it makes a difference to the way they work. A third say they 'drift off and don’t work at their usual pace', 28 per cent suffer from headaches and can't concentrate and 62 per cent reveal they generally just 'muddle through the day'

Institute of Alcohol Studies 2014, Alcohol in the Workplace Factsheet, London, IAS.

 

NB This is a secondary source: the original press release does not exist on Vitality (acquired PruHealth) website. YouGov Archive does not appear to contain original data tables.

4: Alcohol, the workplace and wider social implications

CHANGE ABOVE STAT/SOURCE TO:

30%/3 in ten UK adults is drinking above the Chief Medical Officer’s low-risk guidelines 

 

Source: Ipsos MORI (2016). Drinkaware Monitor 2015: UK adults experiences of and views on cutting down. London: Ipsos-MORI, Drinkaware.
4: Alcohol, the workplace and wider social implications   17 million sick days every year due to alcohol; 200,000 people every day turn up to work with a hangover. 

Sick days: “A report by the Cabinet Office (2003) estimated the number of working days lost because of alcohol misuse. Sickness absence because of alcohol among alcohol-dependent and non-alcohol dependent employees was estimated at around 17 million working days missed annually”

200,000 people at work with hangover: see above  

 Source: Source: NICE (2010). Business case: Alcohol-use disorders: preventing harmful drinking. London: HMSO.

200,000 people at work with hangover: Institute of Alcohol Studies 2014, Alcohol in the Workplace Factsheet, London, IAS.

 4: Alcohol, the workplace and wider social implications  Alcohol misuse costs NHS an estimated £3.5bn per year                 “10. In what it describes as an evidence paper which it submitted with its memorandum to our inquiry, the Department of Health tells us that the cost to the NHS of alcohol misuse is £3.5 billion a year (2009–10 costs)”  Great Britain, Parliament, House of Commons (2012)  Government’s Alcohol Strategy. London: The Stationery Office. HC 132(2012-13)
4: Alcohol, the workplace and wider social implications Alcohol related crime: £11bn/year “The Home Office has recently updated the estimate of the cost of alcohol-related crime: £11 billion in 2010/11 prices. This figure includes the cost of general offences (like violent crime) that are alcohol-related, the cost to the Criminal Justice System of alcohol specific offences (like drink driving) and the cost of issuing Penalty Notices for Disorder. This estimate was arrived at using the same methodology as that which lay behind the widely quoted figure of £8-13 billion in 2006/07 prices. The previous estimate was presented as a range due to a methodological uncertainty, which has now been resolved. Further information is available on request from the Home Office.” Great Britain, Parliament, House of Commons (2012)  Government’s Alcohol Strategy. London: The Stationery Office. HC 132(2012-13).

Drinkaware for Employers: It works for you:

We don’t have evidence to back up claims we make for effects of the programme. Need to reword as potential benefits of lowering alcohol use among employees, not imply that that will definitely happen as a result of the programme.