Commenting on the Office for National Statistics (ONS) 2016 survey into drinking habits published today (Wednesday 03/05/2017), Dr John Larsen, Drinkaware Director of Evidence and Impact said:

“Whilst it is encouraging to see that young people aged between 16 and 24 years old are increasingly tending to drink less often or are becoming teetotal, there are some worrying figures in the survey.

 

“The Office for National Statistics data shows that 45 to 64 year olds are as likely to binge drink[i] as those between the ages of 16 to 24. Most people wouldn’t think that sitting at home and having more than three pints or drinking most of a bottle of wine in front of the television is binging but the units add up.

 

“There are short and long term health risks associated with drinking at risky levels from interrupted sleep and weight gain to cancer, liver and heart disease. Small reductions in drinking alcohol can make a positive impact on your health.

 

 “The Chief Medical Officers’ guidelines recommend that people do not regularly drink more than 14 units per week. If people do choose to drink that amount, they should do so evenly over three days or more.

 “Drinkaware is committed to reduce alcohol-related harm by helping people make better choices about their drinking. To find how you can benefit from reducing your alcohol intake, please visit drinkaware.co.uk/little-less.”

 

[i]The Office for National Statistics defines binge drinking as males who exceeded 8 units of alcohol on their heaviest drinking day, and females who exceeded 6 units on their heaviest drinking day.